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Leisure Time Use and Academic Correlates of Alcohol Abuse among Teenagers in Rural Pennsylvania

In the provided article on leisure time use and academic correlates of alcohol abuse among teenagers in rural Pennsylvania, we learn about the connections between alcohol and social and vocational attitudes.

In the provided article (see attached at the bottom) on leisure time use and academic correlates of alcohol abuse among teenagers in rural Pennsylvania, we learn about the connections between alcohol and social and vocational attitudes.

According to the article, “adolescents’ use of alcohol is becoming more problematic” (Pendorf, 1992) but “it may not be prudent for adults to suggest that alcohol use is entirely bad” when considering its connections to social growth such as self-discovery, acquiring self-esteem and friends (Pendorf, 1992).

Here, we explore a few of the correlations between variables.

Which two variables are most strongly related? Explain.

The two variables that are the most strongly related are consuming hard liquor (on some frequent basis according to the continuous scales of measurement) and participating in social entertainment activities like attending parties, movies, etc. With a correlation of hard liquor to entertainment at 0.37, indicating that consumers of hard liquor are likely to participate in these types of activities, the next closest correlation was between beer consumption (again, on some frequent use basis) to entertainment activities with a factor of 0.28. Students that reported “use of any type of alcohol weekly or more often were classified as heavy users, or abusers” (Pendorf, 1992) and one can assume these data are correlated as well to skew the data somewhat.

What type of relationship exists between those involved in vocational activities and the consumption or reported consumption of beer, wine, and hard liquor? Explain.

The relationship between the consumption of beer, wine, and hard liquor and engaging in vocational activities like holding, or searching for a job is positive, with a reported positive correlation all around. Beer correlates to vocational activities at 0.22, wine at 0.17, and hard liquor at 0.18.

One can assume that having access to vocational income more than likely results in the ability to procure alcohol of some kind, either through social connections at the vocational activity, or through financial income leading to purchase of alcohol from some source. According to the data, it certainly seems that individuals that report being involved with working, or “who are at least looking for work, are heavier users of alcohol” (Pendorf, 1992).

Is involvement in religious activity related to consumption or reported consumption of beer, wine, and hard liquor? Explain.

Involvement in religious activity seems to be negatively correlated to consumption of alcohol, regardless of type (as in beer, wine, or hard liquor). All three report negative correlations, meaning that consumers of alcohol (as reported), from the sample set of data including high school teenagers, are less likely to engage in religious activities if they report consuming alcohol at some measured rate.

The research data does not correlate frequency of consumption, as in yearly, weekly, daily, and correlations to activity. It would certainly be interesting to see if heavy users (daily), versus light users (annually) differ in terms of correlations between consumption and various activities.

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Pendorf, J. E. (1992). Leisure time use and academic correlates of alcohol abuse among high school students. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education.

Original Article: Pendorf, J. E. (1992). Leisure time use and academic correlates of alcohol abuse among high school students. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education